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Richly Engraved Lord Ganesha Temple Bell Wall-Hanging
A richly adorned mukhamandala (countenance) of Lord Ganesha to uplift the aesthetics of your home. This is a wall-hanging that you may put up at the entrance to your poojana-kaksha or at your threshold. With Lord Ganesha being the presiding deity over new beginnings, it would exude auspiciousness and good cheer every time you or your visitors step in to your space.Fashioned from pure brass, it depicts the slightly bowed head of Ganesha, as if in veneration. The long, thick trunk - the most defining aspect of this elephant-faced deity - cascades down by a few inches. At the tip of the trunk is a densely engraved temple bell, which is designed to produce a sound as beautiful as the curved walls of the exterior. Zoom in on the same to appreciate the diversity of engravings arranged into concentric circular rows about the body of the bell.In fact this sculpture is big on engravings. There are serrations on the trunk of Lord Ganesha. In addition to the same, the adornments are defined by the sculptor with strategic engravings across the temple, down the wide-set brow, and at the base of the tusks. The motifs are traditional and, as such, are soothing to the devoted onlooker. The elegantly engraved ears of the Lord Ganesha wall hanging complete the composition.
Richly Engraved Lord Ganesha Temple Bell Wall-Hanging
A richly adorned mukhamandala (countenance) of Lord Ganesha to uplift the aesthetics of your home. This is a wall-hanging that you may put up at the entrance to your poojana-kaksha or at your threshold. With Lord Ganesha being the presiding deity over new beginnings, it would exude auspiciousness and good cheer every time you or your visitors step in to your space.Fashioned from pure brass, it depicts the slightly bowed head of Ganesha, as if in veneration. The long, thick trunk - the most defining aspect of this elephant-faced deity - cascades down by a few inches. At the tip of the trunk is a densely engraved temple bell, which is designed to produce a sound as beautiful as the curved walls of the exterior. Zoom in on the same to appreciate the diversity of engravings arranged into concentric circular rows about the body of the bell.In fact this sculpture is big on engravings. There are serrations on the trunk of Lord Ganesha. In addition to the same, the adornments are defined by the sculptor with strategic engravings across the temple, down the wide-set brow, and at the base of the tusks. The motifs are traditional and, as such, are soothing to the devoted onlooker. The elegantly engraved ears of the Lord Ganesha wall hanging complete the composition.
Radha-Krishna Within The Body Of a Fish
The undying image of Radha-Krishna’s togetherness is a favourite with makers of devotional art. The painting you see on this page depicts the amorous couple within the body of a matsya (fish), queen of the waters. The tribhanga murari is, of course, playing on the flute, His body jutting laterally in three different places (shoulders, hips, and ankles). His beloved Radha is an integral aspect of His muralidhar iconography. She is situated right next to Him as She dances with abandon in His proximity, swayed by His divine music.Madhubani paintings are the hallmark of the region’s (present-day Mithila) folk art. Developed by homebound women seeking to beautify their dwellings, it is usually done on an organic canvas with homemade vegetable-based dyes. Note the limited yet vibrant colour palette of this painting and the sheer proportion of detail despite the rudimentary techniques of traditional Madhubani painting.The fish, within which lie the gorgeously dressed couple, is a richly adorned one. It is wrapped in delicate pink silks that float about it as it swims. Its scales and mouth are dyed with vermillion, indicative of its being a bridal fish. Hints of lace at the gills and the tail. Note the simplistic yet powerful brushstrokes that make up the lifelike waters of the surrounding.
Radha-Krishna Within The Body Of a Fish
The undying image of Radha-Krishna’s togetherness is a favourite with makers of devotional art. The painting you see on this page depicts the amorous couple within the body of a matsya (fish), queen of the waters. The tribhanga murari is, of course, playing on the flute, His body jutting laterally in three different places (shoulders, hips, and ankles). His beloved Radha is an integral aspect of His muralidhar iconography. She is situated right next to Him as She dances with abandon in His proximity, swayed by His divine music.Madhubani paintings are the hallmark of the region’s (present-day Mithila) folk art. Developed by homebound women seeking to beautify their dwellings, it is usually done on an organic canvas with homemade vegetable-based dyes. Note the limited yet vibrant colour palette of this painting and the sheer proportion of detail despite the rudimentary techniques of traditional Madhubani painting.The fish, within which lie the gorgeously dressed couple, is a richly adorned one. It is wrapped in delicate pink silks that float about it as it swims. Its scales and mouth are dyed with vermillion, indicative of its being a bridal fish. Hints of lace at the gills and the tail. Note the simplistic yet powerful brushstrokes that make up the lifelike waters of the surrounding.

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