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Devi Sarasvati Dances To The Music Of Her Veena
Devi Sarasvati, wife of Brahma, queen of the veena. She is the presiding deity over learning and the fine arts; and as such the veena is indispensable to Her iconography. The Sarasvati that you see on this page conforms to the norm and depicts Her dancing to the sound of Her veena. The four arms of the chaturbhujadharini are intact: while the anterior ones cradle the long, slender body of the musical instrument, the posterior ones wield the rosary and a pothi.The Devi, Her form as long and lithe as the veena, is sculpted in keeping with the Hoysala style. It is the name given to the architecture and iconography that flourished in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries under the patronage of the Hoysala dynasty rulers. The sculpture that you see on this page is a fine example of the same. The double lotus pedestal with the latticeworked section and the lotus petal engravings. The vine-like plumage of the peacock, vahana of Devi Sarasvati, and fishtail sashes descending from either side of Her curvaceous hips. The long, intricately sculpted hands and feet. The signature shringar and the ratio in which the features of Her countenance have been executed. Each aspect of the Devi has been carved with adherence to the textual iconography that prevailed in the Hoysala period and an unputdownable degree of shraddha (devotional skill).Devi Sarasvati dances to the music that births and sustains the triloka (three realms of existence).
Devi Sarasvati Dances To The Music Of Her Veena
Devi Sarasvati, wife of Brahma, queen of the veena. She is the presiding deity over learning and the fine arts; and as such the veena is indispensable to Her iconography. The Sarasvati that you see on this page conforms to the norm and depicts Her dancing to the sound of Her veena. The four arms of the chaturbhujadharini are intact: while the anterior ones cradle the long, slender body of the musical instrument, the posterior ones wield the rosary and a pothi.The Devi, Her form as long and lithe as the veena, is sculpted in keeping with the Hoysala style. It is the name given to the architecture and iconography that flourished in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries under the patronage of the Hoysala dynasty rulers. The sculpture that you see on this page is a fine example of the same. The double lotus pedestal with the latticeworked section and the lotus petal engravings. The vine-like plumage of the peacock, vahana of Devi Sarasvati, and fishtail sashes descending from either side of Her curvaceous hips. The long, intricately sculpted hands and feet. The signature shringar and the ratio in which the features of Her countenance have been executed. Each aspect of the Devi has been carved with adherence to the textual iconography that prevailed in the Hoysala period and an unputdownable degree of shraddha (devotional skill).Devi Sarasvati dances to the music that births and sustains the triloka (three realms of existence).
The Paralokiya Glory Of Lord Ganesha
Son of Shiva-Parvati, prince of paraloka (otherworldly realm of existence), Lord Ganesha reclines in the belly of a gigantic lotus bloom. Surrounding the golden pistil is a luxuriance of pale pink petals, the colour so delicate that there are undertones of white on each. They quiver with life; they float on the deep blue waters, executed with complex strokes of the brush in order to convey tumult. A similar bloom of much smaller proportions is to be found in the left posterior hand of the seated Lord Ganesha, which is an integral part of His iconography.From beneath the lotus-throne, the shades of blue of the waters seemingly evaporate upwards into the skies. Gossamer tints of a cold, ice-like blue predominate the background of the composition. Shimmering against the same is the pure gold with which the crown of Lord Ganesha has been finished, and the rubies, sapphires, and emeralds studded therein. The roseate complexion of His chubby body is brought out by the richly coloured silks He is wearing and the gleaming jewel tones infused into His gold-embossed ornaments. He looks straight ahead of Him with the gaze of omniscience on His brow and the right anterior hand raised in generous blessing.Lord Ganesha is seated in lalitasana and reclines on a bolster upholstered in green and gold. Next to the golden tassel is His vahana, the humble mouse. Its stance is one of devotion and with its minuscule hands it holds up an offering of a laddoo to Him.
The Paralokiya Glory Of Lord Ganesha
Son of Shiva-Parvati, prince of paraloka (otherworldly realm of existence), Lord Ganesha reclines in the belly of a gigantic lotus bloom. Surrounding the golden pistil is a luxuriance of pale pink petals, the colour so delicate that there are undertones of white on each. They quiver with life; they float on the deep blue waters, executed with complex strokes of the brush in order to convey tumult. A similar bloom of much smaller proportions is to be found in the left posterior hand of the seated Lord Ganesha, which is an integral part of His iconography.From beneath the lotus-throne, the shades of blue of the waters seemingly evaporate upwards into the skies. Gossamer tints of a cold, ice-like blue predominate the background of the composition. Shimmering against the same is the pure gold with which the crown of Lord Ganesha has been finished, and the rubies, sapphires, and emeralds studded therein. The roseate complexion of His chubby body is brought out by the richly coloured silks He is wearing and the gleaming jewel tones infused into His gold-embossed ornaments. He looks straight ahead of Him with the gaze of omniscience on His brow and the right anterior hand raised in generous blessing.Lord Ganesha is seated in lalitasana and reclines on a bolster upholstered in green and gold. Next to the golden tassel is His vahana, the humble mouse. Its stance is one of devotion and with its minuscule hands it holds up an offering of a laddoo to Him.

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