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Harmonious Brothers, Krishna And Balarama
The harmonious togetherness of Lord Krishna and Lord Balarama. Sons of Devaki-Vasudeva, they were brought up by very loving albeit different mothers. Krishna is revered as an avatara of Lord Vishnu, while Balarama is the presiding deity over fitness or strength and agriculture (the former being indispensable to the latter). The painting that you see on this page depicts the two brothers in unison under the golden apple tree (known in the vernacular as ‘bael’). Their arms are linked around each other’s backs and they gaze lovingly into each other’s eyes. Compare the distinct complexion of their bodies - Krishna’s characteristic blue-dusk skin to the pristine hue of Balarama’s body - and the pastel-coloured dhoti and angavastram they are wearing. Tall pearl-studded crowns, the tips of which reach the canopy of the tree. From their wide-set eyes to the curves of their bodies and the shapely digits of their hands and feet, each aspect of the brothers’ forms has been executed with a superb aesthetic.A rich peach hue defines the solid-coloured background. It is strewn with snowflake-like blossoms and the deep blue shoot of the bael tree. An inverted lotus pedestal of a glassy blue colour, upon which is a studded golden-coloured platform. An ornate vine the colour of peacock plumage frames this Krishna-Balarama composition.
Harmonious Brothers, Krishna And Balarama
The harmonious togetherness of Lord Krishna and Lord Balarama. Sons of Devaki-Vasudeva, they were brought up by very loving albeit different mothers. Krishna is revered as an avatara of Lord Vishnu, while Balarama is the presiding deity over fitness or strength and agriculture (the former being indispensable to the latter). The painting that you see on this page depicts the two brothers in unison under the golden apple tree (known in the vernacular as ‘bael’). Their arms are linked around each other’s backs and they gaze lovingly into each other’s eyes. Compare the distinct complexion of their bodies - Krishna’s characteristic blue-dusk skin to the pristine hue of Balarama’s body - and the pastel-coloured dhoti and angavastram they are wearing. Tall pearl-studded crowns, the tips of which reach the canopy of the tree. From their wide-set eyes to the curves of their bodies and the shapely digits of their hands and feet, each aspect of the brothers’ forms has been executed with a superb aesthetic.A rich peach hue defines the solid-coloured background. It is strewn with snowflake-like blossoms and the deep blue shoot of the bael tree. An inverted lotus pedestal of a glassy blue colour, upon which is a studded golden-coloured platform. An ornate vine the colour of peacock plumage frames this Krishna-Balarama composition.
Sharp-Nosed Apsara Looks Into A Handheld Mirror
The apsaras of Indraloka are stuff of pure beauty. Without them and the poetry of their being, the realm of existence (‘loka’) of the great devas including but not limited to Lord Indra would not be what it is. The apsaras are daivika (of the devas or of a divine nature) muses and go by multiple epithets across Hindu-Buddhist cultures of Asia. The one that you see on this page is a fine example of the youthful apsara, Her figure and form replete with a celestial beauty.Note the alluring tribhanga stance of her body, jutting out (‘bhanga’) laterally at three (‘tri’) different junctures. It is a stance that accentuates the sharp ratios of her curves, enough to lure the mightiest deva into asakti. She is wearing a dhoti of silk wound tightly around her hips and down her limbs, which reveals the gorgeous shape of her long legs. But for a thick neckpiece that covers the length of her decolletage and squeezes between her full breasts, her torso is bare. Amulets and wristlets enhance the fullness of her limbs.With the left hand the apsara holds a mirror that she raises to her face. She looks into it with a searching glance for perfection. A sense of admiration descends upon her; a faint smile plays in the corners of her mouth. Her dense hair is gathered in a thick bun that seems to draw her neck subtly backwards. Finally, the bindi on her brow and the kundalas in her ears complete her shringar.
Sharp-Nosed Apsara Looks Into A Handheld Mirror
The apsaras of Indraloka are stuff of pure beauty. Without them and the poetry of their being, the realm of existence (‘loka’) of the great devas including but not limited to Lord Indra would not be what it is. The apsaras are daivika (of the devas or of a divine nature) muses and go by multiple epithets across Hindu-Buddhist cultures of Asia. The one that you see on this page is a fine example of the youthful apsara, Her figure and form replete with a celestial beauty.Note the alluring tribhanga stance of her body, jutting out (‘bhanga’) laterally at three (‘tri’) different junctures. It is a stance that accentuates the sharp ratios of her curves, enough to lure the mightiest deva into asakti. She is wearing a dhoti of silk wound tightly around her hips and down her limbs, which reveals the gorgeous shape of her long legs. But for a thick neckpiece that covers the length of her decolletage and squeezes between her full breasts, her torso is bare. Amulets and wristlets enhance the fullness of her limbs.With the left hand the apsara holds a mirror that she raises to her face. She looks into it with a searching glance for perfection. A sense of admiration descends upon her; a faint smile plays in the corners of her mouth. Her dense hair is gathered in a thick bun that seems to draw her neck subtly backwards. Finally, the bindi on her brow and the kundalas in her ears complete her shringar.

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